Louella Cabin Restoration; Celebrating the Preservation Act

Louella Cabin Restoration; Celebrating the Preservation Act


Reta Laford: The work we are commemorating today is
truly amazing not only does the work protect the site,
it keeps the spirit of Louella alive and shares it with the world, ensuring current and future enjoyment
through the recreation cabin rental program. And the success you see here
today could not have been done without the student Conservation Association volunteers.
Thomas: Hi my name is Thomas I’m from Northern Virginia way out east, and so what we did
here we started with painting the outside of the cabin that was one of our
first projects, and simultaneously we also got like these paths built in. So a lot of
digging pulling up grass, taking rocks from down, what used to be a huge gravel
pile and bring them all here. Also then focused on the inside and started painting
in there and just doing like little repairs where we saw it needed it. We also got the deck re-done. We had to
take out all the boards which was a little bit harder than I thought it was
supposed to be, I like destroying stuff but I guess it’s harder that I thought. and that was the majority of our
projects. We also worked on the shed painting that, making it look nice and
then in the orchard we started to look for the foundation of the old CCC camp
but we were greeted by unwanted visitors the hornets who decided to chase us out
instead. Kristen Hauge: So a little history about Louella cabin… This is one of our success
stories under the National Historic Preservation Act and that’s part of what
we’re also commemorating today is the 50th anniversary of the National
Historic Preservation Act which was signed in October of 1966. This one of
the buildings that we managed to bring back, one of our very earliest guard
stations. It was built by a man named Edward
Cheney, named for his wife, he was from Michigan and he was one of the early
Rangers in 1907,1910. During the CCC of course the Forest Service got a
massive infusion of Workforce. It was Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s New Deal
program and Camp Louella was established down along the road in the meadow.
But, the work they did included the Gold Creek Road many of the trail shelters, out on
the trails, many of the campgrounds and they finished off the Deer Park Road
that’s known as the highway of the CCC. Joy: I’m Joy, I’m 16 and I’m going to be a
junior and I’m from Frederick, Maryland. I got interested in SCA because my dad was
on a crew in I believe 1975 was the exact year and he was in Olympic National
Park. So I really wanted to follow his example and live some of the stories he
told me…come out here. So I signed up not knowing where I’d be stationed but I
was really happy to find it was the Olympic National Forest. Some of my
favorite projects are the ones that taught me valuable life skills that I’m
going to be using as an adult, both in studying Environmental Studies and in
starting my own life and having a house. On our days off seeing the mountains that
we did going to La Push, a lot of nearby attractions just reminded us that we are
enabling people to experience the same thing now that they can stay in such a
nice cabin. I think everyone had a positive experience leaders and members
on this crew, and this is just the start of our involvement in conservation and
preservation. Lauren: We really, really enjoy working with Olympic National Forest you
guys here and folks that are out here today are really making your experience
so great. Reta: Their hard work and commitment speaks for itself, and I am truly
comforted knowing they are our future environmental leaders. SCA leader not shown: Really I am just so grateful for all the hard work these guys have done. Volunteers: Singing

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